Breaking the Anxiety Cycle: Family Intervention Can Help Anxious Parents Raise Calm Kids

A woman who won't drive long distances because she has panic attacks in the car. A man who has contamination fears so intense he cannot bring himself to use public bathrooms. A woman who can't go to church because she fears enclosed spaces. All of these people have two things in common: they have an anxiety disorder. They're also parents.

Each of these parents sought help because they struggle with anxiety, and want to prevent their children from suffering the same way. Children of anxious parents are at increased risk for developing the disorder. Yet that does not need to be the case, according to new research by UConn Health psychiatrist Golda Ginsburg.